January 30, 2023
10 Historic Sites in San Fransisco

San Fransisco is the commercial, financial, and cultural center of Northern California.  On the west side you have the wild and open Pacific Ocean, on the east you have the slightly more sedate San Francisco bay.

San Francisco is really an innovative and somehow fresh city with a pleasant climate, a cool sea breeze and open-minded people. The city is though most famous for its steep, charming streets. As you roll around with the little cable cars, you’ll see amazing sceneries and lots of colorful charming houses standing side by side. 

10 Historic Sites in San Fransisco

Mission Dolores

Top Historic Sites in San Fransisco

Mission Dolores was a Spanish mission built in 1721 in what is now San Augustine County, approximately 20 miles west of the Texas-Louisiana border. 

The site tells an important history on the Native American encounters with Texas’ earliest European settlers. There are no historic above-ground relics of the mission today. Archeological investigations and historical records have confirmed the mission site. 

Mission Dolores is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and a State Antiquities Landmark. The land is also crossed by the El Camino Real de los Tejas National Historic Trail.

Visitors can learn about the history of the site by visiting the museum, where interpretative displays describe the tale of Mission Dolores.

Jackson Square

Historic Sites in San Fransisco

Web Stories: Top 10 San Francisco’s Highlights

Jackson Square, a National Historic Landmark in the heart of the French Quarter, is one of New Orleans’ most iconic sights.

Every year, approximately 2 million visitors and locals visit the 2.5-acre site, which holds a variety of city events and festivals, weddings, and photographic sessions. Jackson Square has even appeared in a number of popular feature films and television shows.

The bronze monument of Andrew Jackson in the center of the square gives the landmark its name.

Nob Hill

Nob Hill

Nob Hill is a signature area in San Francisco, known for its city landmarks and the famous hotels that flank Huntington Park. It also offers unexpected facets to those who dig further.
The area is affected by the varied characteristics of the downtown areas that surround it, making it an exciting destination to explore in addition to its posh nature.

The Presidio

The Presidio

More than 350 buildings, which spent 200 years in a military enclave, have been repurposed as museums, restaurants, and recreational facilities.

Highlights area National Cemetery, Civil War barracks, Victorian mansions, a World War II memorial, the Walt Disney Museum, the Society of California Pioneers Museum, and the heritage gallery in the Officers’ Club.

War Memorial Opera House

War Memorial Opera House

Inaugurated in 1932, this building is dedicated to World War Isoldiers. In 1945 it hosted the plenary sessions that preceded the founding of the UN and, in 1951, it was the site of the signing of the peace treaty between the US and Japan.

North Beach

This entire area resonates with the history of the early Italian residents, but even more with the icono-clastic legacy of the revolutionary Beats, who brought the neighborhood worldwide fame.

Historic churches stand as clearland marks, while equally historic saloons and cafés take a little snooping around to find.

Haight-Ashbury

Haight-Ashbury

Another famous San Francisco neighborhood is Haight-Ashbury. This distinct and colorful community hosted the ‘Summer of Love’ in 1967. The Haight has a rich history and is still thriving now.

It’s a fun place to spend some time during your trip to San Francisco. Shopping, walking tours, trekking to the top of Buena Vista Park, and viewing its beautiful murals and Victorian mansions are among the top things to do in the Haight.

The name Haight-Ashbury comes from the intersection of these two streets. This specific corner in the neighborhood is where the height of the action took place. 

Fillmore Auditorium

Fillmore Auditorium

One of the legendary homes of psychedelic rock during the 1960s. Along with the Avalon Ballroom and the Winterland (both now gone), this is where the San Francisco sound found its first audience.

Ferry Building Marketplace

Ferry Building Marketplace

Once the tallest building in the city, with a 235-ft (71.6 m) high clock tower modeled after the Giralda tower in Seville, in 1898 this was the headquarters of countless street cars and ferry boats.

Fireboat crews saved the tower from the 1906 fire. Now, it’s a huge foodhall and marketplace.

Fort Point National Historic Site

Fort Point National Historic Site

At this much-photographed site under the Golden Gate Bridge, swords, guns, and cannons are on view at a fortification that was built during the Civil War to protect the city from an attack by sea, which never came.

Rangers and costumed docents give free tours of the gun powder store house, the barracks, and the museum.

Click here to find hotels and accomodations in San Fransisco