November 29, 2022
Wat Mahathat

Wat Mahathat | It’s a massive temple complex with a busy crowd that is fascinating due to its ambience. It dates back to the 17th century. The bot and the wihan were both restored between 1844 and 1851. The mondop that gives this temple the name the Temple of the Great Relic. It also has the cruciform-shaped roof that is which is a rarity in Bangkok. 

The Wat Mahathat is the national headquarters of the Mahanikai monastic order, and also houses the city’s only two Buddhist institutions (meditation classes are available at 7am, noon, and 6pm, in the vicinity of the monks quarters). Traditional herbal medicine markets as well as a weekly market with stalls can also be found there.

Wat Phra Mahathat Thailand is a royal temple part of the Ayutthaya Kingdom. It is among the most ancient and significant temples of Ayutthaya because it was home to the sacred relic of Buddha. Some important royal ceremonies from the Ayutthaya period were held in this place. If the Ayutthaya Kingdom fell at the end of 1767, Wat Phra Mahathat became heavily damaged by fire and was removed from the site.

Attractions of Wat Phra Mahathat

The temple is situated within The Ayutthaya Historical Park. Attractions of Wat Phra Mahathat of Phra Nakhon Si Ayutthaya include relics of historic structures such as pagodas, octagonal pagodas, the royal hall, small temples with murals, the Bodhi tree, and the famous sandstone Ayutthaya-style head depicting the Buddha image inside the tree’s root.

Nearby attractions include the Ancient Palace, the only foundation of the building remaining to be visited this day. It is located at Wat Phra Sri Sanphet, one of the most important temples located in the royal palace of the Ayutthaya period.

The other is Wat Ratchaburana, which is directly opposite Wat Phra Mahathat as well known for its lavishly designed main pagoda. It is also Wat Phra Ram, constructed during King Ramesuan in the same area where his father, King Ramathibodi I, was cremated. It is also known as Vihara Phra Mongkhon Bo Phit, named in honor of Phra Mongkhon Bophit, which is the sitting Buddha image created with the gesture of subduing Mara.